M13 The Hercules Globular Cluster


The count down has begun for the long awaited vacation which will begin for me at 2:30pm Friday afternoon and I am looking forward to it!!!.

I haven’t made any real plans yet but,if the weather cooperates I plan on doing a lot of observing day/night.

On my old blog I have had a few post about the Hercules Cluster but,since I wasn’t able to transfer all of the post from my old blog to here.I guess I will have to start from scratch and post a new image.I am not sure how long I will be staying with wordpress.com because,it is becoming obvious that if I post too many images I will have to start paying for the space and the way I see it is; if I have to pay for the space then I might as well start my very own website with all of the features that I want which includes creating my own theme.OR….just go back to vela.net and deal with errors, which is also a free site and provides all of the space I need ??!.The reason I am questioning wordpress.com IS…while I am writing this post,I am looking at a message stating that I have used 58% of 50 Mb  buy more.Hmmmm,seems to me when I exported all 150 post(s)including links,blogroll and comments from vela.net to my Pc, it was only 29 Mb’s?.Even though I am not very computer savvy,I can’t help but to think I smell something fishy?!!!.Any thoughts???.

At its distance of 25,100 light years, its angular diameter of 20′ corresponds to a linear 145 light years – visually, it is perhaps 13′ large. It contains several 100,000 stars; Timothy Ferris in his book Galaxies even says “more than a million”. Towards its center, stars are about 500 times more concentrated than in the solar neighborhood. The age of M13 has been determined by Sandage as 24 billion years and by Arp as 17 billion years around 1960; Arp later (in 1962) revised his value to 14 billion years (taken from Kenneth Glyn Jones).

According to Kenneth Glyn Jones, M13 is peculiar in containing one young blue star, Barnard No. 29, of spectral type B2. The membership of this star was confirmed by radial velocity measurement, and is strange for such an old cluster – apparently it is a captured field star.

Below is another image I shot a couple months ago.I cropped and enhanced it just a bit.Skies were clear and the transparency was good.Haven’t seen those kind of skies since!!.

Image credit: Andrew

Imformation credit:seds.org

M13

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16 Responses to “M13 The Hercules Globular Cluster”

  1. I ran across a reference to Barnard 29 as well. I did a bit of net searching but was unable to find where it is actually located. I did come up with a site listing “Barnard Objects” http://www.eastvalleyastronomy.org/barnard.html but apparently this is a list of dark nebula so “Barnard 29” is not on the list. All this just to put an arrow on an image pointing to “Barnard 29”, I wonder why I spend my time on such things….

  2. Hi Vern,I believe it is located in the outer halo but,where is another question.Their doesn’t seem to be a lot of visual imfo on it!.
    Andrew

  3. […] the Clouds has a nice story and photograph about M13, the globular cluster in Hercules. It's one of my favourite skywatching […]

  4. What a great shot.

  5. http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070518.html

    “But approaching the cluster core upwards of 100 stars could be contained in a cube just 3 light-years on a side”

    now that’s a really dense core!
    😉

    m13 is my favorite object in the sky

  6. Matt??????
    Wow,how ya do’in?.Been a long time.Everytime I went to your site I ended up at some goofy ringtone page.That is why I took you off the blogroll.I will put it back up again.
    Welcome back!
    Andrew

  7. Dense is right and not a very friendly place either.With just our little sun popping and sputtering,imagine what it must be like with that many stars so close together!.
    I have added you to my blogroll as well.
    Clear skies,
    Andrew

  8. Hi Andrew,

    Bout d@mn time you move your blog so *everyone* can have access. Anyway, have you ever considered Blogger? I’ve posted hella photos/graphics and never have I seen any restrictions regarding limited MBs. Anyway, love the new blog….astrophotos look so much better against a black background.

    Be seeing you.

    ~Z~

  9. Just thought of something else. You could host your images at PhotoBucket and post them on WordPress. It’s easy. All you do is copy & paste the html tag from PhotoBucket into the “code” part of your post on WordPress and voila! At PhotoBucket you get 1GB of space and also 25GB of bandwidth per month all for FREE.

    Check out your options before you go back to Vela. 🙂

  10. Yep, it’s me hahaha. My domain expired and it was held through registerfly … some company named enom wanted me to txfr it and I held off because I wasn’t sure about them. I wound up using godaddy. I’ve been flipping through my old photos and found some nice Moon shots that I will be putting on my site so people know I’m around.

  11. “I exported all 150 post(s)including links,blogroll and comments from vela.net to my Pc, it was only 29 Mb’s?.Even though I am not very computer savvy,I can’t help but to think I smell something fishy?!!!.Any thoughts???.”

    If you can manage your account at the file/folder level, check and see if you migrated any backup files over. Those can chew up disk space quickly on a server. Either download them to your C drive or delete the older ones, keeping the most recent.

    Hope that helps?

  12. […] M13 The Hercules Globular Cluster « Above the clouds: At its distance of 25,100 light years, its angular diameter of 20′ corresponds to a linear 145 light years – visually, it is perhaps 13′ large. It contains several 100,000 stars; Timothy Ferris in his book Galaxies even says “more than a million”. Towards its center, stars are about 500 times more concentrated than in the solar neighborhood. The age of M13 has been determined by Sandage as 24 billion years and by Arp as 17 billion years around 1960; Arp later (in 1962) revised his value to 14 billion years (taken from Kenneth Glyn Jones)… […]

  13. Nice post, I added the link in the Galactic Globular Clusters Database.
    In passing, it seems that M13 is rather popular, since it’s first in my page view statistics.. 😉

    http://www.mporzio.astro.it/~marco/gc/vclusters.php

    Kind regards,

    Marco

  14. Hi Matt,
    Do you still have your scope?.I will be popping over to your site regularly.HAHAHAHA,I was a bit spooked when I found that your site had been taken over by a seedy ringtone ad.
    I still have full access to my old blog on vela.net.I might delete the files that have already been exported and send them to “C” drive to see if any difference has been made and importing them to my new blog.If all else fails then at least I have the original images that I have posted.
    Yeehaw,it appears that our global astronomy club is coming back together!!!.
    Andrew

  15. Hi ~Z~,
    Glad to see that you made it here.HAHAHAHAHAHAHA,and all it took was for me to move my blog.I almost went with blogger but,decided to give wordpress a try first.I doubt that I will go back to vela.net but,the thought is maybe keep the blog there and write a occasional post.My full intention in the future is to have my own site however,that won’t be for a while.
    Photobucket is a thought and I will be looking into it.
    Andrew

  16. Welcome Marco,
    You are right about M13 being popular.It seems that everytime I have my scope out,I have to take a look.M15 is another very popular cluster although lacking M13’s size it is still fun to look at.I have added your site to my blogroll.You have a lot of good information which gives me alot of additional objects to look for.
    Andrew

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