Copernicus


I finally had some decent skies to enjoy and took full advantage of it.Almost all of my astrophotography involved the use of my Pentax ist’ds dslr.Since the sky was actually a bit washed out due to the brightness of the moon,I knew that any deepspace images would be a frustrating waste of telescope time.So,I figured that I would play with my LPI (lunar plantary imager). For those of you that have been following my blog.You will remember the problems that I have using the imager.I don’t own a laptop Pc and since the LPI operates via a pc.I bought about 60ft of ethernet cable so I can run the LPI from my second floor apartment.This idea is all fine and dandy except for one oversight.Running up and down the stairs about 30 times trying to center the object on the CCD so it is visible on the monitor gets tiring after a few trips.Apparently,lady luck felt bad for me and I was able to center the moon in the imager on my first try.While I have never spent too much time using the imager in the past,I took the opportunity to play around with it and see what it could really do.NOTE* I have used it a couple of times before but,never exclusively for a entire night of imaging.So,with only a few hours before bed time and lady luck on my side I was able to get some really nice shots of some other moon shots,which I will share at a later time.

I took the image below using a Meade LPI and a 2x barlow and was a stack of 150 images.I used Registax and photoshop elements for post processing.

Being one of the most recognized craters on the moon.The Copernicus crater was named by Giovanni Riccioli, who in conformity with the church,publicly opposed the  heliocentric system revived by Nicolaus Copernicus. Riccioli is quoted as having “flung Copernicus into the Ocean of Storms” (Oceanus Procellarum); nevertheless in naming one of the most prominent craters on the Moon for the man, he may have indicated his true intent. Later the crater was nick-named “the Monarch of the Moon” by Thomas Gwyn Elger.

Information credit: Wikipedia

Image credit: Andrew

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