Copernicus crater


Now that Spring has sprung…well,not really!. We got lightly spanked with 7 Inches of snow a few days ago. With the Sun climbing ever higher each day.The snow we did get is slowly melting away. I did have to remove the snow from the observatory dome ,so I could get some imaging in.
I actually wasn’t going to do any imaging last night ,but the sky had cleared enough to do so. Can’t waste a clear sky,even if it is for a couple hours.
The temp was dropping ,and the transparency was pretty bad due to the low pressure system that have us the snow a few days ago. Yup…it is just slowly wandering away from the NE coast. If the stars are twinkling ,then I don’t bother to open the dome!. Last night was the exception. It makes it tough to grab images worthy of posting. The image below was a 500 frame AVI. All said and done,I could only use 30 frames. Why?..you may ask. Well,yes I could have stacked the whole file,but trying to get all the images to perfectly align at a 90-95% best frame value would have created a extremely fuzzy, muddled mess,and rendered the image unusable.
The Copernicus crater is a object that I have been wanting to image with the Neximage 5. Seems that clouds have been the center of attention since January.
The Copernicus crater offers a lot of detail and can easily be seen with a good pair of binoculars.
If you have a scope I highly suggest you give this crater a look. According to some sources.Copernicus was formed between 800 million and 1 billion years ago.
If you look at this crater you will notice the huge amount of regolith that surrounds the crater. More amazing is the fact that some of the rubble surrounding the crater are huge chunks of lunar bedrock that has been thrown from the crater at impact. Knowing that this crater is approximately 56 miles/95 Km’s across ,and judging from how far the debris extends from the crater.The impact must have been incredibly intense.

Image credit: Andrew
video-13-03-21-20-21-07

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